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Supporting the Essential Work of Responders
Photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati
by
Dr. Jim Guy
on
October 10, 2017
|

This morning on my way to work, I heard a radio update on the rapidly moving wildfires in Northern California, among the worst in our history.  It left me feeling overwhelmed and sad.  It’s hard to think of a time when there have been so many tragic events in our country in such a short period of time.  Hurricanes, earthquakes, mass-fatality shootings, huge fires – all in a matter of a few weeks. 

Our emergency first responders move from one crisis to the next, sometimes with only a few days to recover.  This is essential work, done by people of great courage and compassion.  But, it takes a toll on their mind, body, and spirit.  That’s why the Headington Institute exists, to help them prepare, recover, and continue. 

This week, I will meet with the command staff of responders who were at the concert in Las Vegas during last week’s shooting.  Some of their colleagues were killed or injured.  By helping them understand their reactions to this traumatic event and how to recover, they will be able to assist others overcome the grief, fear, and despondency spreading across the organization.    

These are difficult times.  But, there is hope.  I still believe that good is more powerful than bad.  For nearly 20 years, we’ve helped promote first responder individual, team, and family resilience and trauma recovery.  There’s never been a time when we’ve been needed more than today. 

Thanks for your donations, advice, encouragement, and referrals.  Together, we are doing this good work.

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