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There is reason to be hopeful
by
Dr. Jim Guy
on
August 29, 2017
| Resilience | Trauma & Critical Incidents | First Responders | From the Office |

Like you, I've been troubled by the speed and size of the destruction of Hurricane Harvey. The terrible suffering of so many people affects us all. Most of us feel the urge to help. The power of human kindness seems to grow in response to the magnitude of the emergency. But, despite the inspiring stories of rescues and generous sacrifice, we know that things will be hard in Texas and Louisiana for a long, long time.

The suffering will continue far beyond the media coverage. The impact of this event will radiate out past the immediate victims, to include family, friends, acquaintances, and most Americans. We will all struggle to support those who have lost the most, while also wrestling with our own need to recover and restore.

In our work at the Institute, we’ve seen this pattern of survival, recovery, and restoration repeated hundreds of times. This has included individuals, teams, groups, organizations, and communities that have overcome significant trauma and rebuilt their resilience and continued onward.

Although lives are deeply impacted by events like Harvey and the aftermath, we have an amazing capacity to recover and move on, especially with a little help.

There is reason to be hopeful, despite the severity of the moment.

We know this to be true – that’s why we do this work at the Headington Institute.

To help yourself and others in this process, I encourage you to check out and share our free online resources. In particular, you may find the following to be useful right now:

One more thing: your presence in the lives of these hurricane victims helps them in immeasurable ways. Reach out however you can, and help us do the same.

Thanks.

Jim

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