Array
(
    [id] => 47
    [PARENT_ID] => 0
    [PAGE_ID] => 0
    [name1] => Blog
    [url] => blog-home
    [visible] => 1
    [hide] => 0
    [viz_head] => 1
    [viz_foot] => 1
    [order] => 7
    [multiple] => 0
    [dead] => 1
    [slave] => 0
    [php_file] => 
    [has_detail] => 0
    [indent] => 0
    [c_count] => 2
    [parent_url] => 
    [dead_url] => blog
    [kids] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 24
                    [PARENT_ID] => 47
                    [PAGE_ID] => 0
                    [name1] => Blog Home
                    [url] => blog-home
                    [visible] => 1
                    [hide] => 0
                    [viz_head] => 0
                    [viz_foot] => 0
                    [order] => 1
                    [multiple] => 1
                    [dead] => 0
                    [slave] => 0
                    [php_file] => blog.php
                    [has_detail] => 1
                    [indent] => 1
                    [c_count] => 0
                    [parent_url] => blog
                    [root_url] => blog
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 27
                    [PARENT_ID] => 47
                    [PAGE_ID] => 0
                    [name1] => Newsletter Archives
                    [url] => newsletter-archives
                    [visible] => 1
                    [hide] => 0
                    [viz_head] => 0
                    [viz_foot] => 0
                    [order] => 2
                    [multiple] => 1
                    [dead] => 0
                    [slave] => 0
                    [php_file] => newsletter.php
                    [has_detail] => 1
                    [indent] => 1
                    [c_count] => 0
                    [parent_url] => blog
                    [root_url] => blog
                )

        )

    [kid_is_url] => 1
)
Staying Close While Apart: Maintaining Personal Relationships While Deployed
by
Alicia Jones
on
May 9, 2014
| Resilience |

Staying Close While Apart: Maintaining Personal Relationships while Deployed

We invite you to watch our latest video on maintaining relationships. Over the years, we’ve heard many humanitarians and first responders speak of the toll of the work on their romantic life. The humanitarian travel schedule and long separations can certainly create challenges for both partners!

In spite of these challenges, we strongly believe individuals can maintain thriving relationships in the midst of humanitarian assignments. Watch the video and reflect on the basic principles. Below are a few practical tips that fall under these principles. We also invite you view an additional resource on this topic.

10 tips for Maintaining Personal Relationships while Deployed

  • Let your partner know how you will be in touch while you are away
  • Short, daily regular interactions are beneficial. Don’t wait till you have time/energy/creativity to write a long email or skype call. Even brief, regular interactions can go a long way.
  • If you are the traveling spouse, take the initiative to make contact. Chances are, if you chose this line of work, separation is fairly easy for you. Resist your natural urge to disconnect and become singularly focused on the work. Your partner will appreciate it.
  • Make your partner/family part of your team. Communicate to them that their support matters to you. (Health-wise it absolutely does).
  • Develop comforting rituals before you leave.
  • Be extra patient with your partner before you leave and after you return. Both exits and reentries will naturally feel disruptive.
  • Don’t enter into heavy conversations just before leaving or in the first 2 weeks after you return. Research shows that your brain will not be functioning normally and your natural reactivity (susceptibility to arguments) will have increased.
  • Find ways to connect your loved one to your work. Sharing photos, journals, blogging can help.
  • Upon reentry, be prepared to do most of the initiating of reconnecting. Enter gently. Research shows it’s generally more difficult for the homebound partner than the traveler. Respect this, even if you are returning from a crisis zone. Show interest in even the mundane daily parts of life that you may have missed.
  • Communicate to your partner that they are your highest priority, even before work. Be prepared to take time off to invest in the relationship when needed. Establish regular rhythms of fun when you are home.
Array
(
    [title] => bid_277
    [short] => bid_286
    [desc] => bid_287
    [images] => bid_291
    [video] => bid_292
    [date] => bid_288
    [author] => bid_365
    [cats] => bid_278
)