Array
(
    [id] => 47
    [PARENT_ID] => 0
    [PAGE_ID] => 0
    [name1] => Blog
    [url] => blog-home
    [visible] => 1
    [hide] => 0
    [viz_head] => 1
    [viz_foot] => 1
    [order] => 7
    [multiple] => 0
    [dead] => 1
    [slave] => 0
    [php_file] => 
    [has_detail] => 0
    [indent] => 0
    [c_count] => 2
    [parent_url] => 
    [dead_url] => blog
    [kids] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 24
                    [PARENT_ID] => 47
                    [PAGE_ID] => 0
                    [name1] => Blog Home
                    [url] => blog-home
                    [visible] => 1
                    [hide] => 0
                    [viz_head] => 0
                    [viz_foot] => 0
                    [order] => 1
                    [multiple] => 1
                    [dead] => 0
                    [slave] => 0
                    [php_file] => blog.php
                    [has_detail] => 1
                    [indent] => 1
                    [c_count] => 0
                    [parent_url] => blog
                    [root_url] => blog
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 27
                    [PARENT_ID] => 47
                    [PAGE_ID] => 0
                    [name1] => Newsletter Archives
                    [url] => newsletter-archives
                    [visible] => 1
                    [hide] => 0
                    [viz_head] => 0
                    [viz_foot] => 0
                    [order] => 2
                    [multiple] => 1
                    [dead] => 0
                    [slave] => 0
                    [php_file] => newsletter.php
                    [has_detail] => 1
                    [indent] => 1
                    [c_count] => 0
                    [parent_url] => blog
                    [root_url] => blog
                )

        )

    [kid_is_url] => 1
)
The Changing Approach to Humanitarian Assistance
by
Fara Choi Ashimoto
on
January 2, 2014
| Resilience | Stress & Burnout |

This month's issue of Interaction's Monthly Developments Magazine has a featured article from our team!

Read an excerpt:

Over the last decade, the humanitarian community has come a long way in understanding the challenges aid work presents to the mental health of humanitarian staff. It has slowly shifted from a trauma response model—waiting until individuals exhibit problems before helping them—to a model that embeds aspects of preventative care within agency policies. And it has gradually shifted from viewing staff crises in the field as strictly a matter of individual vulnerability to recognizing our collective ethical imperative for staff well-being.

Most mental health crises in the field are normal reactions to highly abnormal situations, and no one is immune from the toxic psychological effects of these situations. This is pushing employers to become increasingly cognizant of their responsibilities in this regard. The growing impact of legal liability is certainly adding to this pressure. Many organizations now provide more predeployment preparation, security training, and some access to mental health or peer support services. Finally, research has demonstrated the significant role management plays in the ability of humanitarian staff to cope with challenging environments. A chaotic agency response to crisis or challenge significantly influences the impact of trauma on staff.

So perhaps now is a good time to evaluate where we stand. What has changed? How are changes in organizations’ structures or the context of aid work impacting aid worker mental health? What are we learning about mental health and aid work that deserves our attention? Where do we go from here?...

To read more click here!

Array
(
    [title] => bid_277
    [short] => bid_286
    [desc] => bid_287
    [images] => bid_291
    [video] => bid_292
    [date] => bid_288
    [author] => bid_365
    [cats] => bid_278
)